Nashville Baseball Stadium Con’t

It appears that the old Nashville thermal plant site is no longer going to be a potential site for a downtown Nashville baseball stadium. The site is going to be sold to the highest bidder and that certainly is not going to be the Nashville Sounds or their development partner. It appears more likely to be sold to a group backed by Tower Investments headquartered in Northern California. I would imagine that Tower would plan to use the acreage to build a mixed use residential, retail, and commercial center as that is their standard formula. Don’t get me wrong, Tower will build an exceptional riverfront development, but no baseball stadium and that is disappointing.

So what is the next best location in downtown? The clear answer is in the Market District just north of the Capital. The best potential site in the Market District is between Second and Fourth Avenues and between Stockyard and Jackson Street. This site is within walking distance from the downtown core, 2 blocks from the Cumberland River, 3 blocks from the Farmer’s Market, and only 5 blocks from Historic Germantown:

downtown Nashville baseball stadium

The Market District is currently undergoing a transformation from a light industrial and warehousing district into a mix-use residential, retail, and commercial district. It is defined by the area between Eighth Avenue North and the Cumberland River and between Jefferson Street down to James Robertson Parkway. Located within this area is the Nashville Farmer’s Market, the Bicentennial Capitol Mall, the famous Stockyard Restaurant, and the future home of the Museum of African American Music Art & Culture. Residential developments include the Riverfront Condos, District Lofts, and Harrison Square.
What could the Market District look like with a baseball stadium? If I had my way, it would look a little like Wrigleyville in Chicago (on a smaller scale, of course). Can’t you image sitting in the upper decks watching the Sounds play with the Nashville skyline just above the outfield wall?

nashville baseball stadium views

The baseball stadium should be built with home plate at the corner of Second Avenue and Jackson Street or at the corner of Fourth Avenue and Jackson Street in order to maximize the view for the fans. Third Avenue should cease to go through the site and all traffic should be routed counter-clockwise around the stadium in a one-way roundabout format. Jackson, Stockyard, and Harrison Streets will all need to be widened in order to accommodate the heavier traffic flow. Parking can be handled by the existing parking at Bicentennial Mall and the government surface lot.

It is our firm belief that construction of an urban baseball stadium will allow the Market District, Germantown, and Salemtown to full revitalize within 5 years of completion. The Nashville real estate market will boom in this area and commercial construction will soon follow making this a true Wrigley-like area. If the city gets smart, they will contact the Civic Design Center, the Downtown Partnership, and Metro Planning Department to initiate a master plan for the Market District to insure the creation of green space and urban landscape.

If you enjoyed this post, you might also enjoy:
Nashville Baseball Stadium Proposal
The New Nashville Convention Center
You Can’t Blame Bush for the Economy!

Nashville Baseball Stadium Con’t

It appears that the old Nashville thermal plant site is no longer going to be a potential site for a downtown Nashville baseball stadium. The site is going to be sold to the highest bidder and that certainly is not going to be the Nashville Sounds or their development partner. It appears more likely to be sold to a group backed by Tower Investments headquartered in Northern California. I would imagine that Tower would plan to use the acreage to build a mixed use residential, retail, and commercial center as that is their standard formula. Don’t get me wrong, Tower will build an exceptional riverfront development, but no baseball stadium and that is disappointing.

So what is the next best location in downtown? The clear answer is in the Market District just north of the Capital. The best potential site in the Market District is between Second and Fourth Avenues and between Stockyard and Jackson Street. This site is within walking distance from the downtown core, 2 blocks from the Cumberland River, 3 blocks from the Farmer’s Market, and only 5 blocks from Historic Germantown:

downtown Nashville baseball stadium

The Market District is currently undergoing a transformation from a light industrial and warehousing district into a mix-use residential, retail, and commercial district. It is defined by the area between Eighth Avenue North and the Cumberland River and between Jefferson Street down to James Robertson Parkway. Located within this area is the Nashville Farmer’s Market, the Bicentennial Capitol Mall, the famous Stockyard Restaurant, and the future home of the Museum of African American Music Art & Culture. Residential developments include the Riverfront Condos, District Lofts, and Harrison Square.
What could the Market District look like with a baseball stadium? If I had my way, it would look a little like Wrigleyville in Chicago (on a smaller scale, of course). Can’t you image sitting in the upper decks watching the Sounds play with the Nashville skyline just above the outfield wall?

nashville baseball stadium views

The baseball stadium should be built with home plate at the corner of Second Avenue and Jackson Street or at the corner of Fourth Avenue and Jackson Street in order to maximize the view for the fans. Third Avenue should cease to go through the site and all traffic should be routed counter-clockwise around the stadium in a one-way roundabout format. Jackson, Stockyard, and Harrison Streets will all need to be widened in order to accommodate the heavier traffic flow. Parking can be handled by the existing parking at Bicentennial Mall and the government surface lot.

It is our firm belief that construction of an urban baseball stadium will allow the Market District, Germantown, and Salemtown to full revitalize within 5 years of completion. The Nashville real estate market will boom in this area and commercial construction will soon follow making this a true Wrigley-like area. If the city gets smart, they will contact the Civic Design Center, the Downtown Partnership, and Metro Planning Department to initiate a master plan for the Market District to insure the creation of green space and urban landscape.

If you enjoyed this post, you might also enjoy:
Nashville Baseball Stadium Proposal
The New Nashville Convention Center
You Can’t Blame Bush for the Economy!

Proposed Nashville Convention Center Con’t

After posting my first few comments and observations about the proposed Nashville convention center I received quite a few calls. In fact, several of my more conservative friends called me and bashed my comments about the need for a new convention center. My first reaction was astonishment, but my second reaction was to research the potential effects of the convention center even further. Here is what I found out: I found that I may have underestimated our need for a convention center in Downtown Nashville. In fact, we might should consider building a center that could attract over 90% of all convention sizes instead of the 70% the plans currently service.

Modeling the effects of urban convention centers in other cities, it stands to reason that Nashville can compete with the 5 largest convention cities in the United States: Chicago, New Orleans, Orlando, Las Vegas, and Atlanta. If you look at these 5 cities, each has something very unique to offer except for Atlanta. Chicago has lake front, New Orleans has the French Quarter, Orlando has Disney, and Las Vegas has casinos. Nashville has music and a lot of it. I think we can all agree that all of these cities receive an exceptional number of tourists and that a downtown convention center will only help our under performing tourism market.

So what about the locations of convention centers in other cities? Well, I called quite a few residents and business leaders in the 40 largest cities and most would give their left arms in order to build a convention center right in the middle of their downtown. Let’s think about the opportunity Nashville currently has that almost no other city in the United States does. We can put a brand new, first-class convention center smack in the middle of downtown AND connect it to the Country Music Hall of Fame AND the downtown arena that hosts the NHL and many large concerts/event? How is there any question as to whether or not to build?!? Even if the construction where to cost taxpayers a small fortune (which it will not), we should still build it in order to revitalize and build our downtown into a vibrant and safe place for residents. Can’t you imagine thousands of tourists strolling the streets of downtown throwing tons of out of state cash into our economy? It’s like Christmas all year round!

proposed location for the Nashville convention center
Now imagine what a downtown convention center would mean for the Nashville real estate market. Current values for condos, lofts, and homes would absolutely skyrocket as more and more retail and store space was built. There would be no limit to the heights of the downtown Nashville commercial real estate market. National retailers like Nordstroms and Saks 5th Ave would be beating down the doors of the old convention center to grab that prime space. New restaurants, grocery stores, pharmacies, doctor offices, we would have it all. We would also have a much better shot at convincing our elected leaders that we should build the baseball stadium in the Market District.

If you enjoyed this post, you might also enjoy:
Metro Council agrees to Fund Convention Center
Music City Convention Center Update
Fun Nashville Statistics and Facts

Proposed Nashville Convention Center Con’t

After posting my first few comments and observations about the proposed Nashville convention center I received quite a few calls. In fact, several of my more conservative friends called me and bashed my comments about the need for a new convention center. My first reaction was astonishment, but my second reaction was to research the potential effects of the convention center even further. Here is what I found out: I found that I may have underestimated our need for a convention center in Downtown Nashville. In fact, we might should consider building a center that could attract over 90% of all convention sizes instead of the 70% the plans currently service.

Modeling the effects of urban convention centers in other cities, it stands to reason that Nashville can compete with the 5 largest convention cities in the United States: Chicago, New Orleans, Orlando, Las Vegas, and Atlanta. If you look at these 5 cities, each has something very unique to offer except for Atlanta. Chicago has lake front, New Orleans has the French Quarter, Orlando has Disney, and Las Vegas has casinos. Nashville has music and a lot of it. I think we can all agree that all of these cities receive an exceptional number of tourists and that a downtown convention center will only help our under performing tourism market.

So what about the locations of convention centers in other cities? Well, I called quite a few residents and business leaders in the 40 largest cities and most would give their left arms in order to build a convention center right in the middle of their downtown. Let’s think about the opportunity Nashville currently has that almost no other city in the United States does. We can put a brand new, first-class convention center smack in the middle of downtown AND connect it to the Country Music Hall of Fame AND the downtown arena that hosts the NHL and many large concerts/event? How is there any question as to whether or not to build?!? Even if the construction where to cost taxpayers a small fortune (which it will not), we should still build it in order to revitalize and build our downtown into a vibrant and safe place for residents. Can’t you imagine thousands of tourists strolling the streets of downtown throwing tons of out of state cash into our economy? It’s like Christmas all year round!

proposed location for the Nashville convention center
Now imagine what a downtown convention center would mean for the Nashville real estate market. Current values for condos, lofts, and homes would absolutely skyrocket as more and more retail and store space was built. There would be no limit to the heights of the downtown Nashville commercial real estate market. National retailers like Nordstroms and Saks 5th Ave would be beating down the doors of the old convention center to grab that prime space. New restaurants, grocery stores, pharmacies, doctor offices, we would have it all. We would also have a much better shot at convincing our elected leaders that we should build the baseball stadium in the Market District.

If you enjoyed this post, you might also enjoy:
Metro Council agrees to Fund Convention Center
Music City Convention Center Update
Fun Nashville Statistics and Facts

The Current Real Estate Climate in Nashville

Attention residential buyers, with more than 20,000 properties on the market, we are in the largest buyer’s market since the mid-nineties in Middle Tennessee! The Fed just bailed out lenders by lowering their borrowing rate this week so now there are plenty of low interest fixed rate mortgages available. Add these two ingredients together and you have the perfect recipe for purchasing Nashville real estate for record prices. This is the time to go after that dream home you have always wanted or to purchase that downtown Nashville condo to use for weekends and football games. Recently, we have been involved in several bulk investor purchases in and around town as our Nashville investment property base has grown to include many West Coast and East Coast individuals, groups, and institutions.

Still don’t think that you can qualify for the right home loan? Simply put, there are literally hundreds of loan products out there and we can help you sort through the programs. You should contact Melissa Boudreaux with Countrywide Home Loans in Cool Springs – Melissa is the #1 source for Nashville homes loans and mortgages. She will walk you through the rates, payments, discounts, and show you how you will save money on a fixed rate mortgage without having to worry about mortgage scams, unstable subprime lenders, or balloon payments.

What about Nashville commercial property buyers? Great news for you, Nashville is currently ranked #6 in the United States for purchase price, rates of return, and ability to sell for a profit within the next 5 years. Nashville is growing at a phenomenal rate and there is a decided lack of commercial, retail, and industrial property in downtown. Currently owners are receiving $25-30 a foot for prime retail space and $20-25 a foot for second tier space. There is hardly any availability and there appears to be no end to the market’s appetite. Our commercial property managers and commercial real estate brokers are a large reason for our success in Nashville commercial property management.

So what are your next few steps? You need to get online and start searching for homes in Nashville. We offer a free MLS search option that allows you to establish auto searches, save favorite properties or even ask us for additional info with the click of a button. We look forward to serving all of your real estate needs!

If you enjoyed this post, you might also like:
January Home Sales Numbers For Nashville
Mid-Year Nashville Market Update
Taking Nashville’s Real Estate Temperature

The Current Real Estate Climate in Nashville

Attention residential buyers, with more than 20,000 properties on the market, we are in the largest buyer’s market since the mid-nineties in Middle Tennessee! The Fed just bailed out lenders by lowering their borrowing rate this week so now there are plenty of low interest fixed rate mortgages available. Add these two ingredients together and you have the perfect recipe for purchasing Nashville real estate for record prices. This is the time to go after that dream home you have always wanted or to purchase that downtown Nashville condo to use for weekends and football games. Recently, we have been involved in several bulk investor purchases in and around town as our Nashville investment property base has grown to include many West Coast and East Coast individuals, groups, and institutions.

Still don’t think that you can qualify for the right home loan? Simply put, there are literally hundreds of loan products out there and we can help you sort through the programs. You should contact Melissa Boudreaux with Countrywide Home Loans in Cool Springs – Melissa is the #1 source for Nashville homes loans and mortgages. She will walk you through the rates, payments, discounts, and show you how you will save money on a fixed rate mortgage without having to worry about mortgage scams, unstable subprime lenders, or balloon payments.

What about Nashville commercial property buyers? Great news for you, Nashville is currently ranked #6 in the United States for purchase price, rates of return, and ability to sell for a profit within the next 5 years. Nashville is growing at a phenomenal rate and there is a decided lack of commercial, retail, and industrial property in downtown. Currently owners are receiving $25-30 a foot for prime retail space and $20-25 a foot for second tier space. There is hardly any availability and there appears to be no end to the market’s appetite. Our commercial property managers and commercial real estate brokers are a large reason for our success in Nashville commercial property management.

So what are your next few steps? You need to get online and start searching for homes in Nashville. We offer a free MLS search option that allows you to establish auto searches, save favorite properties or even ask us for additional info with the click of a button. We look forward to serving all of your real estate needs!

If you enjoyed this post, you might also like:
January Home Sales Numbers For Nashville
Mid-Year Nashville Market Update
Taking Nashville’s Real Estate Temperature

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